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I’ve put together this post as a list of must read references for anyone seeking to better understand the autistic community. I’ve heard a few people lately say that they wish there were a style guide to autistic acceptance, or that they are worried about saying the wrong thing, or simply that they want to understand the autistic community better.

Of course, “the autistic community” is not a monolith of unified opinions, preferences, or experiences, but there is a thing called autistic culture. And when it comes to autistic acceptance, the neurodiversity movement, and disability rights activism, there are some generally agreed upon principles that make up that culture.

On using Identity First language (“autistic person”) rather than Person First language (“person with autism”). A survey in the UK recently found that 61% of autistic people use the term “autistic person” and only 18% prefer “person with autism.”

  • “Anyone who needs to constantly remind themselves that disabled people are people should probably spend more time examining their own beliefs and less time telling other people how to speak about themselves or their children.” The Logical Fallacy of Person First Language – Musings of an Aspie.
  • ““Autistic” is another marker of identity. It is not inherently good, nor is it inherently bad. There may be aspects or consequences of my identity as an Autistic that are advantageous, useful, beneficial, or pleasant, and there may be aspects or consequences of my identity as an Autistic that are disadvantangeous, useless, detrimental, or unpleasant. But I am Autistic.” Identity and Hypocrisy – Autistic Hoya

What does Neurodiversity mean and what is the Neurodiversity Paradigm? There is a lot of confusion around these terms. The simplest way to understand it is to temporarily remove the prefix “neuro” and see what you have: diversity. Now add neuro back in. The neurodiversity paradigm simply posits that neurological diversity is normal and natural and that non-typical brains are not disordered. But if you want to learn more, read these.

  • “Neurodiversity is a biological fact. It’s not a perspective, an approach, a belief, a political position, or a paradigm. That’s the neurodiversity paradigm (see below), not neurodiversity itself.” Neurodiversity: Some Basic Terms & Definitions – Neurocosmopolitanism
  • “Once we’ve thrown away the concept of “normal,” neurotypicals are just members of a majority – not healthier or more “right” than the rest of us, just more common. And Autistics are a minority group, no more intrinsically “disordered” than any ethnic minority.” Throw Away the Master’s Tools – Neurocosmopolitanism

On Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapies. I know that this is a red hot topic and often I just avoid it altogether for that reason. I’m realistic and I know that most parents embark on ABA with good intentions – after all, it’s said to be the “gold standard” and “only evidence based” autism therapy, over and over again – but I just ask that people listen to autistics on this topic and seriously consider our perspectives. (Also, remember what the road to hell is paved with.)

  • “And there is a good chance that the two of you — the Autistic adult and the parent of an Autistic child — are not even talking about the same thing when you say “ABA.” Major organizations (particularly Autism Speaks) have lobbied hard for Medicaid and insurance companies to cover ABA therapy for Autistic children.” ABA – Unstrange Mind
  • “Why do we not use ABA for the neurotypical population?  This is where the ethical question must be considered.  This is where the “science” behind the use of ABA begins to fray.  If we really believe Autistic people (and children) deserve the same respect, are truly considered equal as those in the neurotypical population, ABA presents some real problems.” Tackling That Troublesome Issue of ABA and Ethics – Emma’s Hope Book
  • “People who can’t say no, can’t say yes meaningfully.” Appearing to Enjoy Behavior Modification is Not Meaningful – Real Social Skills

On functioning labels. Like most autistic people, I completely reject functioning labels (calling autistic people “low functioning” or “high functioning”). They’re inaccurate, ableist, and meaningless (not to mention bafflingly binary!). In the same vein, I also do not use terms like Aspergers, Aspie, HFA (high functioning autistic), classic autism, etc. – they are all just functioning labels in disguise (very poor disguises if you ask me).

  • “This approach does not work and devalues who we are. Besides, the world misses on getting to know our true selves, it misses on learning that there are many different ways to accomplish things, and that definitions like “success” and “independence” are abstract, unique to each individual.” Attitudes: Grading People – Ollibean
  • “One of the central problems of functioning labels is that they presume a uniform set of competencies. Just as neurotypical people aren’t uniformly skilled at everything, autistic people have varying levels of competence in different areas of our lives. For some of us, these levels can be wildly and incongruously varied. They can shift over time, meaning that we might appear to very competent in one area today and much less so a month later.” Decoding the High Functioning Label – Musings of an Aspie

That seems enough (possibly too much?) for an introduction. I hope if you enjoyed any of those blog posts you will read more within the blogs I’ve linked, and as always my Autistic Resources page is chock full of awesome blogs and websites (continually being updated!).

Please feel free to leave a comment or question below, suggest other topics to cover, or suggest more blogs that you think I should read!