What Are You Reading?

Tags

,

I’ve read so many great books since I last wrote a book review post that I’m going to have to break them into two posts – so stay tuned for an upcoming YA Edition. Lately I’ve just been swimming in lists of books I want to read and also stacks of library books all over the house, both non fiction and fiction.

How Children Learn by John Holt. I wish I had read this book long ago – in fact I think it would be much more useful for all expectant parents to read this than to read pregnancy guides and infant care manuals! Although John Holt is known as a pioneer of the unschooling movement, you don’t have to be interested in unschooling or homeschooling at all to enjoy and reap the benefits of this particular work (some of his others are more pointedly anti-school). It is based on his extensive observations of young children (as a 5th grade teacher and as a friend) and engagingly outlines his view that young children learn as naturally as they breathe and as joyfully as they play. The chapters on talking and reading were particularly delightful; the only area where I would quarrel with him is on his view of fantasy play. He asserts that children’s natural fantasies are about being adults, and they only play at princesses and superheroes because they are targeted by adult television and movie creators. This to me seemed more like a side effect of cultural beliefs about the evils of TV and not a genuine observation – after all, storytelling is as old as human language. Before there was TV there were books, and before that raconteurs. I wonder if he would change his view if he were alive today (he died in 1985).

Landline by Rainbow Rowell. In this novel about a successful comedy writer and her troubled marriage, there is a contrived narrative device that fuels the story, but Rowell’s writing is charming and honest enough to pull it off. She paints a picture of a relationship that feels real and relatable. One of most interesting things about the book for me was how I was not entirely sure who to root for, so to speak, as the story unfolded. This is Rowell’s strength – the way she balances writing characters who are truly flawed and sometimes annoy you, infuriate you, or do bad things, and yet she gets you to care about them enough to forgive and maybe even love them. Though her stories are simple and straightforward, her characters stay with you forever because they feel like real people whom you actually once knew. The only Rowell novel left for me to read is Attachments, and I look forward to it.

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes. The story of Louisa Clark, a cafe waitress turned caregiver for a quadriplegic man, and Will Traynor, the man in her care who once was a hotshot corporate exec and thrill seeker and now lives confined to a motorized wheelchair. I would have been wary of this novel based merely on the description – wouldn’t it be sentimental and icky? – but I picked it up because all of my Goodreads friends gave it rave reviews. Indeed this turned out to be a book that I could hardly put down once I picked it up. I had the distinct feeling that Moyes probably researched this book by immersing herself in quad support groups online (I suspected the scenes of Lou’s own online research included a head nod or two to actual people Moyes had chatted with). She treats the subject of Will’s disability with raw honesty, and I felt the ending was deeply satisfying.

The Maid’s Version by Daniel Woodrell. It’s rare for me to not finish a book, but I only made it halfway through this one. Woodrell is perhaps best known for his novel Winter’s Bone, which was made into a movie starring Jennifer Lawrence – however, I doubt I’ll get to reading that any time soon. I found his writing style to be so off putting that, even though I enjoyed the characters and was intrigued by the plot (who burned down the dance hall and killed and maimed dozens of people?), I could not plow all the way through the story. There is a bit of an emperor-has-no-clothes feeling for me when I see how highly rated this book is on Goodreads, like am I just not smart enough to like it? I balked against his frequent use of passive voice, long winding sentences, and use of commas seemingly more to break up run on sentences into chunks than to give them actual grammatical structure. But I suppose it’s just a style preference. There is a rhythm to his writing, almost poetic, that to me obscures the narrative completely but to other may be enjoyable.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 133 other followers